Discover the diverse history of South Charleston

Take some time to discover the vibrant history of our city.  From our native american origins to the Belgian Glassblowers to Rosie the Riveter of World War II…you will find interesting artifacts that tell the stories in local museums.

Adena

Interpretive Center Adena Culture

The purpose of the South Charleston Interpretive Center is to inform you of the beauty, history and importance of the Midland Trail and the Adena Indians. The Center helps visitors travel back in time to learn of the people and culture, which once existed along the trail.

The Center features the Criel Mound (Creel). Throughout the facilities you will find exhibited models, artifacts, brochures, pictures, films, a reader rail, maps of other various Adena Indian Mounds located in the area and maps of the six counties on the Midland Trail. A kiosk which will inform you of the area history is also housed at the Center.

Belgian Glassworkers

The Historical Foundation opened their Belgian Glass Display at the city’s Interpretive Center located at 313 D Street in 2009. Stan Bumgardner created the display for the foundation to honor our city’s first business, the Belgian window glass company. Banner and Dunkirk were the first two companies to locate in the city in the early 1900’s.

Labelle Theater

Walter B. Urling built the original LaBelle, and named the theatre after “Isabelle”, both his daughter’s and mother’s name.  The LaBelle continued to function as a movie house, enduring a name change to Cinema South in the late 1960’s, but closed in the 1980’s. The building served as a church through the 1990’s.  In 2003, the City of South Charleston purchased the building, and work continues to bring The LaBelle back to life again as a working theatre.  Coming soon 2nd run movies! Once movies are finished at main theaters the LaBelle will show them at a discounted rate. Concessions will be available. Stay tuned!

Rent the Labelle Theatre for your next event!

Belgian